~ SPRING HAS SPRUNG AT WAFA ~

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Spring has sprung, and all this new growth has been sprouting enthusiasm at WAFA headquarters.  Birth is happening everywhere . . . new volunteers have joined our group.  We now have Marina Kahle in research and applications, Eva Elise Kraus in research and applications, David Ram in human resources, Jannik Meier Sørensen in social media, Ancuta Gabriela Tarta in research and applications, and Camilla Warmedinger in journalism. Our team is great — so many brilliant people here who want nothing more to do than to bring good news to the world and share the positive side of environmental journalism in water, air, and food.

We are growing.  The excitement is building. . . (Read More Here)

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One Who Teaches with Experience

Wikipedia 375px-Computer_RecyclingTechnology changes at a rapid rate. It’s important for successful businesses to stay up-to-date with new technology. The site eWeek reports that a study done by Techaisle, an analyst and market research foundation, found companies that hold on to their computers for longer than three years, end up spending between $326 to $401 on maintenance of those computers with an extended warranty. For those companies without a warranty that figure jumps up to about $526 for repaired and upgraded computers. They also found that computers malfunction more often after a period of three years, and they suggest replacing them for the most efficient and cost saving measures.

A staggering figure of 355.2 million computers were sold globally in 2011. In 2010, the number was a bit lower at 346.2 million computers that were sold around the world. That means, about every three to five years a large number of those computers are being tossed out, in one way or another.

In 2005, social entrepreneur, Cormac Lynch from Dublin, Ireland, had a plan to do something with all those computers that were being thrown out into the landfills. He wanted to refurbish them for the children around the world, so that they could gain an education. The company he started was named Camara, which is West African for “one who teaches with experience.” In June 2007, 70 volunteers set off with 1,000 computers, and the initiative . . . (Read Full Article)